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Wagging Tails Atlanta Blog - THE WAGGING TALES

By Wagging Tails 10 Jun, 2017

 

Photo via Pixabay by Josche13

 


Becoming a first-time pet owner is a big deal. Animals make us happy, they bring comfort, and they even lower stress, depression, anxiety, and blood pressure in many people. Yet pet ownership is a lot harder than it may seem at first, and it’s important to be prepared before you decide to bring a new pet into your home.

 

There are many things to think about, including making sure the animal is taken care of when you’re away from the house, how to acclimate the animal to your home and schedule, and how to take care of vet expenses should he become ill or injured. It’s imperative to think about all these things and more before choosing an animal so that you’re absolutely positive that you’re ready.

 

Here are some of the most important things to think about--and take care of--when you’re thinking of getting a pet.

 

Think about the what-ifs

 

While many animals are easy to take care of, some have medical issues or have trouble fitting into a family that already has pets. Before you adopt a dog or pick out a cat from the shelter, think about all the what-ifs. What if he gets really sick and you don’t have the funds to take him to the vet? What if you have to work mandatory overtime now and then and can’t get home to let him out? What if he destroys your couch or bites a child? Do you have time to play with him, love him, and take care of him? Do you have the patience it requires to deal with housetraining?

 

If the answer to any of those questions is “No” or “I don’t know,” you’ve got a problem. Think seriously about these what-ifs and be honest about the answers.

 

Do some research

 

Not only do you want to be educated about your ideal breed and age, you also need to make sure your landlord and family will be okay with a new pet. If you live in an apartment, find out if there is a breed restriction or weight limit, and ask about a pet deposit. Talk with your family to make sure everyone is on board with the idea of a new pet, and designate jobs for everyone, such as walking, cleaning out the litter box, feeding, and playtime.

 

Have the right tools on hand

 

Before you bring a new pet home, it’s important to make sure you have all the right tools all ready to go. This includes puppy pads, a litter box, a leash or harness, toys, a scratching post, a crate, a bed, and any training supplies, as well as food and water bowls. Have everything set up before you bring the pet home so that he can become familiar with the routine and where his things are.

 

It’s also a good idea to walk through your home first and make sure there are no hazards that could harm your pet.

 

Make out a schedule

 

If you’re super busy, it might be advantageous for you to make out a schedule that’s easy to follow when it comes to feeding and playing with your pet. Working long hours can mean you won’t have time to get home and let him out or feed him, so consider hiring a dog walking service to ensure your pet won’t have to be stuck inside for several hours at a time.

 

Take time to get to know him

 

If your animal was rescued, he may be shy, nervous, anxious, or unsure about new people/places. Try to be patient and make an effort to get to know his likes and dislikes and what makes him the most comfortable. You might want to hold off on introducing him to new people for a little while and just let him figure out his new environment first.

 

Remember, pet ownership is a big job , and it will take a little while for the both of you to become acclimated to one another. With a good plan and some patience, you and your new pet will grow to love each other unconditionally.


Jessica Brody

Ourbestfriends.pet



By Wagging Tails 12 Mar, 2017
The German Shepherd is also known as the Alsatian, Alsatian Wolf Dog, Berger Allemand, Schaferhund, Deutscher Schaferhund and Shepherd. They are in the working and herding dog groups. They typically have a life span of 9-13 years old and litters of 4-9 puppies. They are double coated dogs usually a tan and black color. Other color variations they can come in include sable, black, white, liver and blue and can be an all over color or double color with black masks and body markings. The German Shepherd is a medium to large breed with an origin dating back to 1899. They were originally bred for herding sheep. They are now mostly working dogs due to their level of strength, obedience, trainability and intelligence. The work they are trained in the most includes search and rescue, military and police roles, disability assistance and even acting. It is the second most registered breed by the AKC and the fourth most registered by the United Kingdom's Kennel Club. German Shepherds are moderately active and curious. They can be very protective of their owners and not always inclined to become instant friends with strangers. They are highly intelligent and thought to be able to learn simple tasks after about five repetitions though this can vary from dog to dog of course. When well trained and socialized they follow commands about 95 percent of the time and are able to quickly learn and interpret instructions better than many other breeds. Common ailments of the German Shepherd is arthritis and hip and elbow dysplasia. They also have a higher than normal occurrence of  Von Willebrand disease and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Overall the median life span rounds out to about 10.95 years which is fairly normal for a breed of their size. They have gained popularity as a breed and as of 2012 they were the second most popular breed in the US.
By Wagging Tails 09 Mar, 2017
  One of the first things you want to teach your new pup is potty training but what are some good basic steps for that? When you house train your puppy remember to be patient, consistent and use positive reinforcement. It generally takes about 4-6 months for your pup to be fully house trained and some may even take up to a year. This of course varies with every dog. The size of your dog also plays a role in that. Smaller breeds have a higher metabolism and smaller bladder which will require more frequent trips as an example. It might be necessary to break old habits. Typically as long as your are consistent and take out your puppy at the first sign they need to go and offer rewards after they will learn so don't worry about any setbacks. It is recommended that you start training your puppy between 12 and 16 weeks old. If they are older than 12 weeks with no training it may take longer. Experts recommend creating a specific space, like a room, crate or even on a leash. As they begin to learn they need to go outside to potty you can increase the freedom to roam about the house. Here are some tips to get you started. Try not to free feed but instead put your puppy on a regular feeding schedule and take the food away between meals. Take the puppy out first thing in the morning and once every 30 minutes to an hour if you are able. Always take them out after meals and before bedtime at night or before they will be left alone. Try taking the puppy to the same spot each time. The scent will prompt them to go. Stay outside until they go. Whenever they potty outside be sure to praise them or give them a treat. Walking around the neighborhood a little farther is a nice reward too. If you are crate training your puppy in the short term keep eyes out for the signs they need to go. Make sure the enclosure is big enough for them to stand, lie down and turn around but no so big they can use a corner for the bathroom. If you use a crate for longer than a couple hours make sure they have water in a bowl or dispenser. Make sure they get a break preferably in the middle of the day especially for the first 8 months. A crate may not be the best option if they continuously potty in it while there as this could mean several things. They might be too young, the crate might be to large or they may not be getting outside enough. Whining, circling barking, sniffing and scratching are common signs they need to go out. Take them out right away if this is the case. They may have accidents if house training is incomplete or their environment changes. Keep up the changing though or consult a veterinarian if you think a medical issue could be the problem. Never punish your puppy for an accident as that only teaches fear. If you see them in the middle of an accident try clapping loudly so they know it is unacceptable and then take them outside. If you find the accident a while after it happened rubbing their nose in it or yelling when they are a puppy wont help. They do not connect your anger with the accident. Stay outside longer and this can help curb the accidents. They may need extra time to explore. Clean up any accidents in the house with a enzymatic cleanser instead of using an ammonia based one to minimize the odors that can attract the puppy back to that spot for a go and remember to always stay positive and follow your routine.


By Wagging Tails 05 Mar, 2017
Most pet owners know their dogs quirks, likes, dislikes and some general information. Here is a list of some fun facts that you may or may not have known about your best friend... Puppy Stuff:   Puppies are born blind, deaf and toothless.Puppies are also twice as likely to play with one another than older dogs are.   Doggie anatomy & Quirks:   Smaller breeds of dogs actually mature faster than the larger breeds.Small dogs are also thought to dream more than the larger dogs but the larger ones dreams last longer.Just like people dogs are right or left handed..err pawed. Their nose prints are as individual as a human's fingerprints. They can hear four times farther than people.They sweat between their paws and they have shoulder blades that are not attached to the rest of their skeleton, allowing for greater flexibility when running.   Fido's Mood:   Dogs are actually often twice as more likely to be aggressive or threaten other dogs when walking on a leash and they are also more likely to be aggressive when being walked by a man than a woman. Dogs have typically three big moods that alter how they wag their tail: happy, agitated and scared. Female dogs tend to play with both genders but often males prefer to play with the females. It is thought that dogs are capable of falling in love. They also can experience jealousy when seeing another dog rewarded.   Over all fun facts:   Did you know that one female dog and her female offspring in a seven year span can produce over 4,000 puppies? There are an estimated 400 million dogs worldwide..that's a lot of puppies! Also, if you have ever signed your pet's name on a greeting card you are not alone. An estimated 70 percent of pet owners sign their pets names on cards!
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Wagging Tails Atlanta Blog - THE WAGGING TALES

By Wagging Tails 10 Jun, 2017

 

Photo via Pixabay by Josche13

 


Becoming a first-time pet owner is a big deal. Animals make us happy, they bring comfort, and they even lower stress, depression, anxiety, and blood pressure in many people. Yet pet ownership is a lot harder than it may seem at first, and it’s important to be prepared before you decide to bring a new pet into your home.

 

There are many things to think about, including making sure the animal is taken care of when you’re away from the house, how to acclimate the animal to your home and schedule, and how to take care of vet expenses should he become ill or injured. It’s imperative to think about all these things and more before choosing an animal so that you’re absolutely positive that you’re ready.

 

Here are some of the most important things to think about--and take care of--when you’re thinking of getting a pet.

 

Think about the what-ifs

 

While many animals are easy to take care of, some have medical issues or have trouble fitting into a family that already has pets. Before you adopt a dog or pick out a cat from the shelter, think about all the what-ifs. What if he gets really sick and you don’t have the funds to take him to the vet? What if you have to work mandatory overtime now and then and can’t get home to let him out? What if he destroys your couch or bites a child? Do you have time to play with him, love him, and take care of him? Do you have the patience it requires to deal with housetraining?

 

If the answer to any of those questions is “No” or “I don’t know,” you’ve got a problem. Think seriously about these what-ifs and be honest about the answers.

 

Do some research

 

Not only do you want to be educated about your ideal breed and age, you also need to make sure your landlord and family will be okay with a new pet. If you live in an apartment, find out if there is a breed restriction or weight limit, and ask about a pet deposit. Talk with your family to make sure everyone is on board with the idea of a new pet, and designate jobs for everyone, such as walking, cleaning out the litter box, feeding, and playtime.

 

Have the right tools on hand

 

Before you bring a new pet home, it’s important to make sure you have all the right tools all ready to go. This includes puppy pads, a litter box, a leash or harness, toys, a scratching post, a crate, a bed, and any training supplies, as well as food and water bowls. Have everything set up before you bring the pet home so that he can become familiar with the routine and where his things are.

 

It’s also a good idea to walk through your home first and make sure there are no hazards that could harm your pet.

 

Make out a schedule

 

If you’re super busy, it might be advantageous for you to make out a schedule that’s easy to follow when it comes to feeding and playing with your pet. Working long hours can mean you won’t have time to get home and let him out or feed him, so consider hiring a dog walking service to ensure your pet won’t have to be stuck inside for several hours at a time.

 

Take time to get to know him

 

If your animal was rescued, he may be shy, nervous, anxious, or unsure about new people/places. Try to be patient and make an effort to get to know his likes and dislikes and what makes him the most comfortable. You might want to hold off on introducing him to new people for a little while and just let him figure out his new environment first.

 

Remember, pet ownership is a big job , and it will take a little while for the both of you to become acclimated to one another. With a good plan and some patience, you and your new pet will grow to love each other unconditionally.


Jessica Brody

Ourbestfriends.pet



By Wagging Tails 12 Mar, 2017
The German Shepherd is also known as the Alsatian, Alsatian Wolf Dog, Berger Allemand, Schaferhund, Deutscher Schaferhund and Shepherd. They are in the working and herding dog groups. They typically have a life span of 9-13 years old and litters of 4-9 puppies. They are double coated dogs usually a tan and black color. Other color variations they can come in include sable, black, white, liver and blue and can be an all over color or double color with black masks and body markings. The German Shepherd is a medium to large breed with an origin dating back to 1899. They were originally bred for herding sheep. They are now mostly working dogs due to their level of strength, obedience, trainability and intelligence. The work they are trained in the most includes search and rescue, military and police roles, disability assistance and even acting. It is the second most registered breed by the AKC and the fourth most registered by the United Kingdom's Kennel Club. German Shepherds are moderately active and curious. They can be very protective of their owners and not always inclined to become instant friends with strangers. They are highly intelligent and thought to be able to learn simple tasks after about five repetitions though this can vary from dog to dog of course. When well trained and socialized they follow commands about 95 percent of the time and are able to quickly learn and interpret instructions better than many other breeds. Common ailments of the German Shepherd is arthritis and hip and elbow dysplasia. They also have a higher than normal occurrence of  Von Willebrand disease and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Overall the median life span rounds out to about 10.95 years which is fairly normal for a breed of their size. They have gained popularity as a breed and as of 2012 they were the second most popular breed in the US.
By Wagging Tails 09 Mar, 2017
  One of the first things you want to teach your new pup is potty training but what are some good basic steps for that? When you house train your puppy remember to be patient, consistent and use positive reinforcement. It generally takes about 4-6 months for your pup to be fully house trained and some may even take up to a year. This of course varies with every dog. The size of your dog also plays a role in that. Smaller breeds have a higher metabolism and smaller bladder which will require more frequent trips as an example. It might be necessary to break old habits. Typically as long as your are consistent and take out your puppy at the first sign they need to go and offer rewards after they will learn so don't worry about any setbacks. It is recommended that you start training your puppy between 12 and 16 weeks old. If they are older than 12 weeks with no training it may take longer. Experts recommend creating a specific space, like a room, crate or even on a leash. As they begin to learn they need to go outside to potty you can increase the freedom to roam about the house. Here are some tips to get you started. Try not to free feed but instead put your puppy on a regular feeding schedule and take the food away between meals. Take the puppy out first thing in the morning and once every 30 minutes to an hour if you are able. Always take them out after meals and before bedtime at night or before they will be left alone. Try taking the puppy to the same spot each time. The scent will prompt them to go. Stay outside until they go. Whenever they potty outside be sure to praise them or give them a treat. Walking around the neighborhood a little farther is a nice reward too. If you are crate training your puppy in the short term keep eyes out for the signs they need to go. Make sure the enclosure is big enough for them to stand, lie down and turn around but no so big they can use a corner for the bathroom. If you use a crate for longer than a couple hours make sure they have water in a bowl or dispenser. Make sure they get a break preferably in the middle of the day especially for the first 8 months. A crate may not be the best option if they continuously potty in it while there as this could mean several things. They might be too young, the crate might be to large or they may not be getting outside enough. Whining, circling barking, sniffing and scratching are common signs they need to go out. Take them out right away if this is the case. They may have accidents if house training is incomplete or their environment changes. Keep up the changing though or consult a veterinarian if you think a medical issue could be the problem. Never punish your puppy for an accident as that only teaches fear. If you see them in the middle of an accident try clapping loudly so they know it is unacceptable and then take them outside. If you find the accident a while after it happened rubbing their nose in it or yelling when they are a puppy wont help. They do not connect your anger with the accident. Stay outside longer and this can help curb the accidents. They may need extra time to explore. Clean up any accidents in the house with a enzymatic cleanser instead of using an ammonia based one to minimize the odors that can attract the puppy back to that spot for a go and remember to always stay positive and follow your routine.


By Wagging Tails 05 Mar, 2017
Most pet owners know their dogs quirks, likes, dislikes and some general information. Here is a list of some fun facts that you may or may not have known about your best friend... Puppy Stuff:   Puppies are born blind, deaf and toothless.Puppies are also twice as likely to play with one another than older dogs are.   Doggie anatomy & Quirks:   Smaller breeds of dogs actually mature faster than the larger breeds.Small dogs are also thought to dream more than the larger dogs but the larger ones dreams last longer.Just like people dogs are right or left handed..err pawed. Their nose prints are as individual as a human's fingerprints. They can hear four times farther than people.They sweat between their paws and they have shoulder blades that are not attached to the rest of their skeleton, allowing for greater flexibility when running.   Fido's Mood:   Dogs are actually often twice as more likely to be aggressive or threaten other dogs when walking on a leash and they are also more likely to be aggressive when being walked by a man than a woman. Dogs have typically three big moods that alter how they wag their tail: happy, agitated and scared. Female dogs tend to play with both genders but often males prefer to play with the females. It is thought that dogs are capable of falling in love. They also can experience jealousy when seeing another dog rewarded.   Over all fun facts:   Did you know that one female dog and her female offspring in a seven year span can produce over 4,000 puppies? There are an estimated 400 million dogs worldwide..that's a lot of puppies! Also, if you have ever signed your pet's name on a greeting card you are not alone. An estimated 70 percent of pet owners sign their pets names on cards!
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